Rocketships Innovative Hiring Process

Most parents don’t have a clue about whos going to teach their child until school has already started. Rocketship Education has revolutionized the process of hiring teachers by allowing parents to assist in teacher interviews and helping choose who gets hired before the year begins.

An article by the Washington Post explained how the parents take a role in the selection process which lets them speak to aspiring educators at RocketShips very first building in D.C.

Rocketship Education has about 13 schools and Chief Executive Officer and cofounding manager Preston Smith in a statement to Education Week said that participation of the parents is always an important part of the companies process. Since the establishment in 2007, Rocketship has earned widespread press for the personalized and blended style of unique teaching. Rocketship has also advocated parental involvement to be the core feature in their strategies.

Smith said that at every school, the parents take some part in the selection. Up to six parents are chosen for the training before they get involved interviews. Sometimes, the schools have sessions where parents come to meet teachers who have made it to the final round of interviews.

At times teachers may have a change of heart, walking away if they don’t feel the job is for them. In one interview, one candidate walked out the during one of the interviews with a parent present. Smith, upon seeing her leaving confronted her about leaving. She stated she was not ready for such a high amount of engagement with the parents, so they shook hands and she went on her way. Smith said that she made the correct decision.

Parents told Washington Post that learning more about the candidates was enjoyable.

Jermaine Carter, one of the parents in an interview stated ‘It is a great idea to get a feel for the person who is going to be teaching your child is and the kind of personality that they have’ While such a method of approving teachers is unique, Rocketship isn’t the first. In the 90s, Los Angeles School District had their kid’s parents get involved in the interviews.