International Relations And How Kamil Idris helps it

The United Nations is dedicated to promoting and maintaining peace between its own members and the few other countries that aren’t members of the international, intercontinental alliance, Its 195 member nations often have issues with one another, even though the United Nations is highly respected and regarded. For example, the United States has placed tariffs on China to the tune of hundreds of billions of dollars, inciting fiery tensions between the two countries.

 

Under the Donald Trump administration – leader of the strongest economy in the world, by leaps and bounds, meaning even relatively minute tariffs on imports can have profound effects – officials have talked about placing tariffs on all incoming goods, disrupting the economies of nearly all 195 member states.

 

Sounds difficult, right? Just think that these issues are only related to one member of the United Nations; further, they’re only related to one issue the U.S. is having.

 

Reasons like this is why the world needs Kamil Idris

 

International relations are difficult to maintain, considering that the world is packed full of widly different cultures that value various goals and end games higher than others, in turn making getting along many times more difficult than one would assume to be true at face value.

 

Kamil Idris is a well-respected figure in the broad field of international relations, boasting many years of experience in positions like Director General of the World Intellectual Property Organization, Secretary General of the internationally-active Union for the Protection of Plant Varieties, and running for the presidency of the chronically war-torn country of Sudan as recently as 2010.

 

How do tariffs between the United States’ Donald Trump administration and China have to do with international relations?

 

Professor Kamil Idris is well-tenured and sensical enough to understand that the newly-founded trade war between China and the United States doesn’t make any sense and certainly isn’t conducive to a productive environment.

 

However, Trump seems to be – and not just on first glance, either; thinking deeply will likely result in this same reasoning – stuck on fulfilling promises he made during campaigning. Idris could surely do a better job.